Bow

One of the main goals during the 2008 underwater survey was to capture video that would enable the City of Hamilton to assess the condition of the vessels. Video was captured using a Seabotics Sea Eye Falcon Remotely Operated Vehicle. The vehicle has an umbilical cord that extends up to the lake surface. The control room is on board a boat on the surface. In this video the port side of Scourge comes into view showing one of her four or six pounder long guns protruding through the gun port in the wooden wall or bulwark. One of the improvements that the United States Navy made to Lord Nelson / Scourge when she was purchased from the United States Revenue Service was to build these short walls to provide some protection from enemy fire. Scourge’s port-side anchor sits on the bottom and as the camera pans towards the bow the cathead can be seen from below protruding over the side from the deck level. The pointed frame of the very front of the ship, or beakhead, ¬†soon comes into view. Traditionally the head of the vessel is the place where sailors go to the bathroom. No doubt this would have been a refreshing experience while under way. The heavy timber extending forward from the stem of the ship at the bow is the bowsprit. Just underneath, the striding figurehead of Lord Nelson comes into view. Over the years Quagga mussels have colonized some of the horizontal and vertical surfaces of both Hamilton and Scourge.