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Long Guns

When Scourge went to the bottom in August of 1813 she carried 10 small long guns. According to Ned Myers, a sailor who survived the sinking, at least two were made of brass, while the rest were made of iron. Four of Scourge’s guns fired four-pound round-shot (cannon balls) while the remainder fired six-pound round shot.  The guns were, not surprisingly, known as four and six pounders.  Like Hamilton’s carronades and pivot gun Scourge’s guns were muzzle loaders. These guns were relatively easy to handle by a five man gun-crew and according to Myers did good service, providing artillery support to the landing infantry at the Battle of York and the Battle of Fort George in April and May of 1813. Nevertheless, compared to the range and power of the larger weapons carried by other vessels such as the schooner Julia, Scourge’s weapons were quite small. After the Battle of Fort George, Ned Myers receives some good natured ribbing from a comrade..

I remember that Jack Mallet [of the schooner Julia] laughed at us heartily for the fuss we made with our pop-guns, as he called them, while we were working upon the English batteries, saying we might just as well have spared our powder, as for any good we did.